Whither Weather?

A long, long time ago, we had an amateur weather station (Oregon Scientific WMR-968) at our house. It had a wind vane/anemometer; a rain gauge; an outdoor thermometer/hygrometer; and an indoor thermometer/hygrometer/barometer. It came with a nice LCD display, and all the instruments communicated their data to the display wirelessly. The instruments also had a small solar panel, and a battery compartment, all weather-tight. The solar panels charged a built-in pair of small rechargeable batteries, and the batteries would power the instrument and the radio. There was also room for you to install fancy/expensive Lithium AA batteries which would allow the instruments to work down to -40 F. The console could be connected to a computer as well, and the computer could run software to gather the data from the instruments, log it, and even post it on the internet! We ran our own little weather site, a sub-domain of tastewar.com, but also posted the data to some other sites, notably The Weather Underground. (Not to be confused with the Weather Underground). It was fun knowing that we were helping to provide a “public service” and conceptually having all that weather data on file.

Well, eventually (after a good number of years), the instruments began to fail. I think a big part of it was the built-in rechargeable batteries. I made a half-hearted attempt at building new battery packs from rechargeable cells I bought on eBay, but never really succeeded, and the station fell into disuse until it was only a clock (yet another clock that had to be reset whenever the power went out). And long before that, the PC that had been logging the weather and posting it to the internet had been replaced with a Mac, and I never took the time to find good Mac software to do the same thing. So we’ve been out of the weather picture for a long time. But it’s always been on my mind to get back in the game.

This Christmas, I used my Christmas money to buy an inexpensive weather station from Costco.

It’s an Acurite 5-in-1 with a snazzy display.

It provides the same basic instruments as the old station, but all the outdoor instruments are housed in a single package. This certainly makes installation easier, but the downside is that the location for each instrument is somewhat compromised. Your anemometer/wind vane is supposed to be up as high as possible, away from any obstructions. Temperature readings, on the other hand, are supposed to be taken at four feet above ground, and the instrument should be out of direct sun, yet away from buildings, etc. Similar for the rain gauge, etc. Oh well! I am just excited to have a weather station again!

The console for this station can also be connected to a computer, and of course, you can run software on the computer to log the data, post to the internet, etc. This time, though, it’s not connected to a big, traditional PC, but rather to a Raspberry Pi,

so it’s very unobtrusive. We are using Meteohub software which is the only Linux package I could find that supports this station. You can view our weather data at The Weather Underground. Someday, we may re-create our own weather site as well.

Going out of Business!

As a kid in high school, I loved reading through the catalogs that came in the mail. Biking catalogs were a favorite. Bike Nashbar and Performance Bicycle I remember. Campmor was another with all kinds of cool outdoorsy gear. But one of the most interesting that came in our mailbox was the Hidalgo Sunglasses catalog. It was printed on cheap newsprint, in black and white, but came loaded with interesting information about sunglasses, and prescription glasses as well. It had actual size pictures of the frames, so you could cut them out and try them on for size. Of course, back then I couldn’t afford anything in the catalog, but I learned a lot by reading it.

Since the dawn of the web, I’ve kept looking for Hidalgo on the web, but they were very late to the game. They did finally arrive, however, in more of a “Web 1.0” style than the “2.0” that was gaining traction. It still looks rather dated, but is full of good information and you can still actually download the entire old fashioned catalog as a PDF. According to the Wayback Machine, they first had a web site around 2001, but it was just a handful of static pages until 2010, when you could finally order from it!

I just visited again today, mostly to find the right URL to pass along to a friend, and discovered that Hidalgo is going out of business. Now I have to decide whether to buy a pair of sunglasses from them before they go out of business…